Uffe Østergaard contributes on the “Danes” to the Encyclopedia:

Ethnic Groups of Europe

 
30/06/2011

Ethnic Groups of Europe

 

Europe is the second smallest continent in the world, its land area comprising only two percent of the earth's total surface. Even so, Europe is home to over 730 million people, all members of interrelated yet distinct populations. From Spaniards and Icelanders in the west to Nogai and Saami in the east, Europe is home to more than 100 different ethnic groups.

 

 Part of a five-volume series on ethnic groups around the world, Ethnic Groups of Europe: An Encyclopedia provides detailed descriptions of more than 100 European ethnic and national groups. Each entry provides an overview of the group as well as in-depth information on the group's origins and early history, cultural life, and recent developments. Among the information presented for each group are global and national population figures and accounts of geographical distribution, diaspora populations, the group's historic homeland, predominant religions and languages, and related groups. The entries also highlight places, people, and events of particular importance to each group, and sidebars introduce related topics of interest.

 

 Throughout the text, special attention is focused on the relationship between ethnicity and nationalism. An explanation of the methodology used for selecting the ethnic groups in the encyclopedia is also provided, as is an introductory essay on the topic of ethnicity in Europe.

 

 Features

 • Includes an introduction describing the concept and practice of ethnicity in Europe, past and present

 • Contains contributions from 80 distinguished international scholars, including some of the foremost experts on particular groups

 

 Highlights

 • Describes over 100 ethnic groups of Europe, including subnational minorities, indigenous peoples, distinctive regional populations, and nationalities

 • Offers both convenient summaries and detailed descriptions of each group's history, religion, language, cultural life, and contemporary situation

 • Includes sidebars that describe related places, events, and groups

 • Features excellent coverage on the many minority groups of European Russia which are often absent from English-language studies, including the Abazin, Avars, Balkars, Kumyks, Kabards, Maris, and Udmurts

 

 

 

Uffe Østergaard: The Danes, pp. 103-107  in Jeffrey E. Cole (ed): Ethnic Groups of Europe – An Encyclopedia, ABC-CLIO/Greenwood, California 2011, ISBN 1-59884-302-8

 

Sidst opdateret: Department of Business and Politics // 13/03/2013