Department of Digitalization

Research Themes

The departments research is organized to create opportunities for collaboration and to accommodate for the fast moving pace and radical innovation that characterizes the IT field. Themes are emergent, topical, popular, inter-disciplinary and dynamic in nature. They are usually active for 3 – 7 years when they transform into other themes or dissolve altogether. Below you can find the departments research themes.

 

Our research themes

AI

COMING SOON

Blockchain

Blockchain in Business and Society

Blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Global organizations and governments as well startup companies and investors have all identified blockchain as a revolutionary technology. Blockchain is a transformative technology that can change the deep structure of business organization and the human enterprise at large.  Similar to the internet, the blockchain has the potential to disrupt multiple industries by making transactions and processes more efficient, more secure, more transparent, and more democratic. Building on the promising potentials of blockchain, members of the research theme examine how the unique features and the underlying mechanisms of blockchain technology and smart contracts can enable the development of new blockchain-based cryptographic socio-economic systems that underlie thriving business ventures in a wide array of markets.


Members:


Further information and inquiries:

Michel Avital
avital@cbs.dk
+45-4185-2037

Data Science

COMING SOON

Digital Anthropomorphism

Digital Anthropomorphism at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Digitalization

The research theme 'Digital Anthropomorphism' focus on the human user of technology. Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human qualities to non-humans (anthro = human, morph = shape, transform into). As customers, users, employees, workers, etc., we assign human qualities to interactive products and machines, and we design products and machines so to enhance this assignment. Our anthropomorphic perceptions influence how we interact with systems, products, machines, robots, animals, plants, and even new technology-enabled realities such as vibrant and smart environments, how much we like them, trust them, and rely on them.
 

What we do

Through collaborative research projects together with academic researchers and danish and international companies, the research theme contributes to increase understanding of 'Digital Anthropomorphism'. Anthropomorphism as a research topic is relatively hot (again) due to smart agents, AI, robotics, recommender systems, automation, and the arts and performances. The 'digital in 'Digital Anthropomorphism' is to signify our take on this.
 

Who we are

Who we work with

  • Academic researchers
  • Danish and international companies
     

What we have researched

For now, please see our research at research.cbs.dk

Digital Ecosystems

Digital Ecosystems at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Digitalization

Contemporary digital technology is increasingly infused into all aspects of human existence, giving rise to new kinds of digital ecosystems that are capable of interconnecting across physical, biological, cognitive, industrial, and social boundaries. As a result, digital ecosystems pose unprecedented problems and challenges for research, business, policy, and society as a whole. In response, the “digital ecosystems” research theme seeks new insights and conceptual innovation to better cope with these developments by (1) studying digital ecosystems as the basic unit of analysis and (2) by utilizing ecological thinking as a conceptual lens. In order for this theme itself to be a healthy ecosystem of ideas, we value diversity and heterogeneity in terms of our viewpoints, approaches, theories, and methods. We, therefore, conduct research and generate insights based on a colourful mix of topics, including digital platform-ecosystems and the platform economy, digital strategy and innovation, digital infrastructures and the political economy of digitalization, the internet of things and open source, and many more.
 

Members and research topics:

Abayomi Baiyere

Assistant Professor

Digital - Transformation and Strategy 

Arisa Shollo

Associate Professor

Digital platform ecosystems; Innovation in digital ecosystems; Decision making in digital ecosystems;

Attila Marton

Associate Professor

Digital ecology of platforms, social memory, and labour; Ecosystemic thinking and digital strategy

Ben Eaton

Assistant Professor

Platformization of infrastructures, and infrastructuring of platforms. Migration of installed bases across “ecologies of platforms”.

Chee-Wee Tan

Professor

Platformization and service innovation

Christian Casper Hofma

PhD Fellow

 

Günter Prockl

Associate Professor

Digital Supply Chains of the Future, Transformation from Supply Chain Management vs Business Ecosystem; Service Ecosystems for Data Driven Services and Services based on IoT 

Ioanna Constantiou

Professor MSO

Digital Transformation, Digital Platforms and new forms of organizing and competition

Juan Giraldo

PhD Fellow

Digital Infrastructure Development and Dynamics, Digital Payment Platforms, Global Payment Ecosystems

Kalina Stefanova Staykova

Assistant Professor

Digital Platform Ecosystems, Digital Payment Platforms, Financial Service Ecosystem 

Kasper Munk

Postdoc

Educational technology, digital future of learning, blended learning, learning sciences, instructional engineering

Katrine Reinhold Folkmann

PhD Fellow

Offerings as digitalized interactive platforms; creative industry service ecosystems; e-commerce platformization

Michael Wessel

Assistant Professor

Dynamics and governance within and across platform ecosystems. Strategic and competitive behavior at the platform and user level.

Michel Avital

Professor

Decentralized and self-organized ecosystems. Blockchain-enabled ecosystems.  

Nicola Ens

PhD Fellow

Dynamics in platform-mediated work; ecologies/ infrastructure in platform work

Nina Frausing

PhD Fellow

Digital Payment Platforms, Financial Service Ecosystem, Incentive-based architecture and governance within digital ecosystems

Philipp Hukal

Assistant Professor

digital technology-enabled innovation within and across organizations, digital platforms, open source software development, digital ventures, computational social science

Shama Patel

PhD Fellow

Human cognition, intelligence and extended cognition in a digital ecosystem, bioecological models of  human development

Stefan Henningsson

Professor MSO

The technological enablement of digital ecosystems from a managerial and strategic perspective. Platformization to move from closed systems to open digital ecosystems. Architecture.

Tina Blegind Jensen

Professor MSO

Digital transformation, platform-mediated work, digital infrastructures.

Xiao Xiao

Associate Professor

Development or emergence of digital ecosystems in the context of digital entrepreneurship. 


Selected Publications:

  • Jetzek T., Avital M. and Bjorn-Andersen N. (2019). “The sustainable value of open government data” Journal of the Association for Information Systems 20(6): 702-734.
  • Mäntymäki M., Baiyere A. and Islam A. N. (2019). “Digital platforms and the changing nature of physical work: Insights from ride-hailing” International Journal of Information Management 49: 452-460.
  • Rukanova B., de Reuver M., Henningsson S., Nikayin F. and  Tan Y. H. (2019). “Emergence of collective digital innovations through the process of control point driven network reconfiguration and reframing: The case of mobile payment” Electronic Markets 30: 1-23.
  • Constantiou I., Marton A. and Tuunainen V.K. (2017). “Four models of sharing economy platforms” MIS Quarterly Executive 16(4): 231-251.
  • Prockl G., Bhakoo V. and Wong Ch. (2017). “Supply chains and electronic markets - Impulses for value co-creation across the disciplines” Electronic Markets 27(2): 135-140.
  • Eaton B., Elaluf-Calderwood S., Sorensen C. and Yoo Y. (2015). “Distributed tuning of boundary resources: The case of Apple's iOS service system” MIS Quarterly 39(1): 217-243.
  • Hedman, J. and Henningsson, S. (2015). “The new normal: Market cooperation in the mobile payments ecosystem” Electronic Commerce Research and Applications 14(5): 305-318.
  • Manikas K., Wnuk K. and Shollo A. (2015). “Defining decision making strategies in software ecosystem governance” White Paper: Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen.
  • Kallinikos J., Aaltonen A. and Marton A. (2013). “The ambivalent ontology of digital artifacts” MIS Quarterly 37(2): 357-370.


Research projects / grants:


Talks:

  • Constantiou I. and Marton A. (2018) The 4 Types of Sharing Economy Platforms. DanskIT Digitalization Webinar Series: Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Marton A. (2018) Making Meaning Dataful. Invited presentation for the Børsen Newspaper Marketing Conference: Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Ekbia H. and Marton A. (2018) The New Division of Labour: A Revised History of Computing. Invited presentation at Google Denmark.


Media:


Contact person:

Digital Health

Digital Health

Digital Health at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Digitalization

Digital Health refers to the convergence of information technologies with the health sector, the individuals’ everyday life and society as a whole. The aim is to make medicine and health care delivery more efficient and more personalized. In this research theme, we conduct excellent research in the field of Digital Health, provide high quality teaching and sustain a strong network of academics and practitioners within and outside CBS who share a common enthusiasm for the impact of new technologies in healthcare.

The greater Copenhagen area is Europe’s no. 1 innovation ecosystem for health technology and pharma where Digital Health is a fast-growing sector. The Department of Digitalization (DIGI) at CBS has a strong track record in Digital Health research. Numerous faculty have completed research, ongoing research, and funded projects in the area of Digital Health. Faculty are engaged in teaching digital health, specifically in the MSc. Innovation in Healthcare (IHC) program’s mandatory and elective courses at CBS. Multiple external lecturers at DIGI have vast practical and entrepreneurial expertise in the field of Digital Health.

The research theme of Digital Health focuses on the broad phenomenon of digitalization in the context of healthcare. Our goal is to examine how digitalization affects the practices in healthcare organizations and the behavior of individuals, ranging from the technical design to the behavioral outcomes of health IT. We investigate how IT changes administrative and clinical processes to enhance the quality and safety of healthcare. On the patient side, we examine how IT is used for prevention and disease management and how it influences health outcomes. Current research topics of this theme include, but are not limited to:

  • Behavioral outcomes of health IT
  • Blockchain in healthcare
  • Data analytics and big biodata
  • Artificial intelligence in healthcare
  • Digital health startups
  • Digital health-related policy
  • Social media in healthcare
  • Quantified self and self-tracking

 

Members

 

Selected Publications

  • Liu, N., Kauffman, R.J. (2020). Enhancing Healthcare Professionals and Care-Providing Staff Informedness with Data Analytics for Chronic Disease Management, Information & Management, in press.
  • Rieder, A., Lehrer, C. & Jung, R. (2020). Affordances and Behavioral Outcomes of Wearable Activity Trackers. In: Proceedings of the 28th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS).
  • Rieder, A., Lehrer, C. & Jung, R. (2019). How Behavior Change Support Systems Influence Self-efficacy: A Qualitative Study Using Wearables. In: Proceedings of the 27th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS).
  • Sun, T. Q., & Medaglia, R. (2019). Mapping the challenges of Artificial Intelligence in the Public Sector: Evidence from Public Healthcare. Government Information Quarterly36(2), 368–383. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2018.09.008
  • Clemons, E.K., Dewan, R.D., Kauffman, R.J., Weber, T.A. (2017) Understanding the Information-Based Transformation of Strategy and Society. Journal of Management Information Systems, Vol. 34, No. 2, 425-456.
  • Kauffman, R.J., Kim, K., Lee, S.Y.T., Hoang, A.P., Ren, J. (2017) Combining Machine-Based and Econometrics Methods for Policy Analytics Insights. Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, 25, 115-140.
  • Till J. Winkler; Pinar Ozturk; Carol V. Brown (2016)  Sustainability Strategies for Regional Health Information Organization Startups. In: Health Policy and Technology, Vol. 5, No. 4, 341-349
  • Till J. Winkler; Alexander Benlian; Marc Piper; Henry Hirsch (2014)  Bayer HealthCare Delivers a Dose of Reality for Cloud Payoff Mantras in Multinationals, In: MIS Quarterly Executive, Vol. 13, No. 4, 193-208.
  • Chang, M.R., Kauffman, R.J., Kwon, Y. (2015) Understanding the Paradigm Shift to Computational Social Science in the Presence of Big Data. Decision Support Systems, Vol. 63, 67-80.
  • Andersen, K. N., Medaglia, R., Henriksen, H. Z. (2012). Social Media in Public Health Care: Impact Domain Propositions. Government Information Quarterly29(4), 462–469. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2012.07.004
  • Troels Andreasen; Henrik Bulskov; Sine Zambach; Tine Lassen; Bodil Nistrup Madsen; Per Anker Jensen; Hanne Erdman Thomsen; Jørgen Fischer Nilsson. A Semantics-Based Approach to Retrieving Biomedical Information. (2011). Flexible Query Answering Systems, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 7022/2011, p. 108-118
  • Medaglia, R., Andersen, K. N. (2010). Virus Outbreak ─ Online GP Consultations Escalating Healthcare Costs. Communications of the Association for Information Systems27(1), 711–724.
  • Zambach, S., Hansen, J.U. (2010) Logical Knowledge Representation of Regulatory Relations in Biomedical Pathways. Information Technology in Bio- and Medical Informatics, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 6266, p. 186-200.

 

Selected funded projects

  • A Cross-National Comparison of Health Information Technology-related Policy Frameworks for Guiding Research and Practice, involving Till Winker, Tina Blegind Jensen, 2018-2020.
  • ReVUS Region-H project to investigate healthcare data sharing using blockchain technology involving Michel Avital, Fritz Henglein, Boris Düdder, José Parra-Moyano, 2019-2021.

 

Further information and inquiries:

Till Winkler
E: tw.digi@cbs.dk

Christiane Lehrer
E: cl.digi@cbs.dk

Digital Sustainability

Digital Sustainability at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Digitalization

United Nations have formulated 17 Sustainable Development Goals. However, it is hard to imagine that they can be achieved without digitalization. For example, SDG 1 - No Poverty - once a political solution is in place a more fair distribution of wealth can only be delivered via a digital monetary system. Another example is SDG 4 - Quality Education - can only be achieved via digital means if we are to supply even the most remote villages with quality edition services, and it can only scale via digital means. Similarly, most of the remaining SDG can only be achieved with digital solutions.

An illustrative example of how digitalization is leading the way is Blockchain. Blockchain will transform most business sectors in the coming years. In global trade, blockchain can help companies become more sustainable while also enhancing their competitiveness. In short, blockchain technology supports increased efficiency, transparency, and trust for global supply chains. It can be utilized to authenticate the product and verify that raw materials originate from a sustainable source. At the other end of the product lifecycle blockchain can support the recycling so that it is done sustainably. Along the supply channels blockchain supports an effective distribution and trade. These are all in line with UNs sustainable development goals (SDG 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure; SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production; SDG 13: Climate Action).

The concurrent digital revolution and ambitions for a sustainable transformation in the 17 SDG's are currently the driving force of societal change for the global community. Advancing the digital agenda as leverage to achieve the SDG's covers many realms: infrastructure development, knowledge, innovation, and circular economic growth, to name a few. There research areas as blockchain and Internet of Things have become critical means to the sustainable development agenda and promise vital contribution to the achievement of the goals.

In order to contribute to a sustainable research agenda, members of the research team examine how digitalization accelerate and enable the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals. Furthermore, the research team will teach and disseminate their knowledge to build understating and digitally powered sustainable competencies for students, decision-makers, organizations, and society.

 

Research topics with a digital sustainability focus:

  • Blockchain
  • IoT
  • Digital Money
  • Education Quality
  • Circular Economy

 

Founders:

Jan Damsgaard, Professor

Thomas Jensen, Assistant Professor

Louise Elisabeth Hansen, Project Administrator

Rony Medaglia, Professor with Special Responsibilities

Raghava Rao Mukkamala, Associate Professor

 

Associated projects:

Advancing Blockchain for Danish Design

Digital Transformation of Work

Digital Transformation of Work Research Theme at Department of Digitalization

Digital technologies transform how, where, and when work gets done. New forms of work, also known as “smart work”, are characterized by spatial and temporal flexibility supported by technological tools that provide employees with the best working conditions to accomplish their tasks. Our research within the theme of Digital Transformation of Work focuses on the profound and accelerating transformation of business activities, processes, competencies, and models that are initiated to fully leverage the changes and opportunities of digital technologies and their impact across society in a strategic and prioritized way, with present and future shifts in mind.   

Digital transformation of work includes new practices in which services and products are produced differently by use of crowds, machines, artificial intelligence, and algorithms. Furthermore, traditional labour law meets digital platforms and the gig-economy. Similarly, meaningful work and employment is considered a scarce resource.
 

Research Topics

  • Digital transformation of public sector work (e.g., what happens when more decision power is delegated to machines?)
  • Crowd work and new models of work (e.g., can we imagine a future crowd workplace in which we would want our children to participate?)
  • Design of new work practices (e.g., how do we design ICT, physical space, and HR practices to support new ways of working?)
  • Flexible & mobile work (e.g., what are the expectations towards being constantly available?)
  • Lived experiences with digital work (e.g., what does being a digital nomad feel like?)
  • People analytics or data-driven approach to managing people at work (e.g., what are the long-term consequences of being managed by algorithms?)


Members


External Collaborators

  • João Baptista, Associate Professor, Warwick Business School
  • Dubravka Cecez-Kecmanovic, Professor, UNSW Business School
  • Uri Gal, Associate Professor, The University of Sydney Business School
  • Riitta Hekkala, Postdoctoral Researcher, Aalto University
  • Gazi Islam, Associate Professor, Grenoble Ecole de Management
  • Jean-Charles Pillet, PhD Scholar, Grenoble Ecole de Management
  • Daniel Schlagwein, Senior Lecturer, UNSW Business School
  • Kamaran Sheikh, PhD Scholar, Warwick Business School
  • Carsten Sørensen, Associate Professor (Reader), LSE


Selected Journal Publications

  • Ranerup, A., & Henriksen, H. Z. (2019). Value positions viewed through the lens of automated decision-making: The case of social services. Government Information Quarterly, forthcoming.
  • Gol, E. S., Stein, M. K., & Avital, M. (2019). Crowdwork platform governance toward organizational value creation. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Preprint.
  • Stein, M. K., Newell, S., Wagner, E.L., & Galliers, R.D. (2019). Datification, Accountability and the Pursuit of Meaningful Work Among Academics. Journal of Management Studies, Preprint. 
  • Busch, P. A., & Henriksen, H. Z. (2018). Digital discretion: A systematic literature review of ICT and street-level discretion. Information Polity, Preprint.
  • Busch, P. A., Henriksen, H. Z., & Sæbø, Ø. (2018). Opportunities and challenges of digitized discretionary practices: a public service worker perspective. Government Information Quarterly, 35(4), 547-556.
  • Roto, V., Clemmensen, T., Väätäjä, H., & Law, E. L. C. (2018). Designing interactive systems for work engagement. Human Technology, 14(2).
  • Jensen, T. B. (2018). Digital Transformation of Work. Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, 30(2), 27-40.
  • Bødker, M. (2017). “What else is there…?”: reporting meditations in experiential computing. European Journal of Information Systems.


Funding and Industry Collaboration

  • Digital Nomadism: How IT Enables New Forms of Working and Organizing, Australian Research Council (2019-2022)
  • Organizational and Managerial Issues of IS in Remote Work in Elisa (2014-2019)
  • E-ledelsesudvikling af fremtidens ledere, i-Lead, Industriens Fond (2017-2021)
  • ICT-enabled Transformation of Work, Timyo (2017-2019)


Conferences and workshops

  • ICIS 2019 track on “Future of Work” (co-chairs: Damien Joseph, Nishtha Langer and Mari-Klara Stein)
  • 5th and 6th Changing Nature of Work (CNoW) workshop at ICIS 2017, Seoul, Korea and ICIS 2018, San Francisco, USA (co-chaired by Mari-Klara Stein and João Baptista)
  • ECIS 2018 track on “Digital Organization, Work, and Beyond” (co-chairs: Michel Avital, Mari-Klara Stein, Carsten Sørensen)


Talks

Helle Zinner Henriksen

  • “Digital transformation of work – your new colleague could be a robot” at CBS Alumni meetup in Singapore, September 30th, 2019
  • ”Det professionelle skøn når forvaltningen bliver mere og mere digital”  [The role of professional discretion in the digital administration] at Områdeudvalget for Kontoruddannelser til den Offentlige Forvaltning, May 15th, 2019
  • “Dating the AI Society: Work Life, Skills and Diversity” panelist at the Copenhagen TechFestival, September 6th, 2018.
  • “Digitaliseringen i det offentlige - hvad vil det kræve af medarbejdere, ledere og arbejdspladser?” [Public sector digitalization – what does it require from employees, managers and the workplaces?] at Altingets Digitaliseringsnetværk, May 2nd, 2017 http://www.altinget.dk/arena/netvaerk/digital
  • Industry 4.0: End of education?” at ENIC/ NARIC, June 26th, 2017 http://www.enic-naric.net/annual-meeting-of-enic-and-naric-networks.aspx
  • “Ny teknologi i socialt arbejde og digitaliserbar lovgivning” [New technology in social work and digitized legislation] at Socialrådgiverdagene, November 1-2nd, 2017 http://www.socialraadgiverne.dk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/2017-11-01-02-Socialraadgiverdage-2017-PROGRAM.pdf

Tina Blegind Jensen

  • Digital Transformation of Work, keynote at IRIS/SCIS CONFERENCE 2018, Aarhus University, Denmark
  • Smart arbejde understøttet af digital teknologi – er det smart?” [Smart work enabled by digital technology – is it smart?] at CBS’s Uddannelsesadministrative Seminar, October 26th, 2017.

Mari-Klara Stein

  • IT Implementations in the Workplace: Managing Uncertainty and Ambiguity” at Sundhedsfaglig festival Sjællands Universitetshospital, September 7th, 2017

 

Further Information

Tina Blegind Jensen
E: tbj.digi@cbs.dk
M: +45 24794372
 

Mari-Klara Stein
E: ms.digi@cbs.dk
M: +45 53550002

FinTech

FinTech at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Digitalization

Historically, payments involved two parties exchanging goods or services for money. Today, payments, with increasing frequency, consist of digital representations of money transferred through a global, highly complex technical infrastructure.

However, there are still 94 billion in coins and banknotes floating around in the economy. There are drawback and benefits with cash. For instance, they are costly (time and security) to manage for banks and merchants, they create negative environmental impact (production and transportation), and they lead to crime of cash. On the other hand cash are easy and convenient to use, they are anonymous, they are national symbols), and they can be used by anyone regardless of age or legal capacity.

Over the past decade payments has evolved due to the increase in online shopping and smartphones. We have witnessed new ways of paying, including PayPal, MobilePay, DSBs ticket app, and new currencies like Art Money and Bitcoins. In parallel, society try to regulate and promote innovations through SEPA and E-Money Driective from EU and merchants in Denmark are trying to change the law so that they can say no to cash.

In this changing and evolving environment, we have created a research theme that will explore some of the issues that Financial Technologies will lead to. We focus on choice of payment instrument, money, payment systems, and adoption of payment methods.


Who we are:


What do we do:

  • How and why does the digital payment infrastructure evolve?
  • How does the digitalization of money affect the use and experience of money (different carriers of money)?
  • How does the digitalization of transactions (process) influence the performance of and preference for different payment methods (means of transferring money)?
  • How does the technology (artifact) influence the performance of and preference for different payment methods (means of transferring money)?
  • How can future money, payment process, and technology be designed?
 
If you are interested and would like to know more, please contact Jonas Hedman


In press

TV2 Finans


DR1

DR 2-dagen
  • Jonas Hedman (Participant), DR2, 5 Apr 2013 (Podcast)

Jyllands-Posten

Fremtidensbank


Research projects/Collaborators

  • Academic: Royal institute of Technology, Stockholm School of Ecnomics, Lund University, University of Cork, University of Augsburg, Essec Business School, Aalto Univeristy.
  • Industry: Danske Bank, Nordea, National Bank, Nets, Finansrådet, Cellpoint Mobile, CFIR


Publications

Carton, F. and J. Hedman (eds.) (2013) Second International Society Cashless Roundtable, 18-19 April, Dublin, Ireland. Link.

Kazan, E. and J. Damsgaard (2013) A Framework for Analyzing Digital Payment as a Multi-Sided Platform: A Study of Three European NFC Solutions, The European Conference of Information Systems in Utrecht, June 5-8, 2013. Link.

Sang-Un, C. and J. Hedman (2013) Exploring Business Models for NFC Enabled Mobile Payment Services: The Case of Google Wallet and ISIS, The European Conference of Information Systems in Utrecht, June 5-8, 2013. Link.

Hedman, J. ed. (2012) First International Cashless Society Roundtable (ICSR), 18-19 May Copenhagen, Denmark. Link.

Olsen, M, Hedman, J and R. Vatrapu (2012) Designing Digital Payment Artifacts, ICEC 2011, The 14th International Conference on Electronic Commerce, Singapore, August. Link.

Hedman, J. and S. Henningsson (2012) Competition and Collaboration Shaping the Digital Payment Infrastructure, ICEC 2011, The 14th International Conference on Electronic Commerce, Singapore, August. Link.

Hjelholt, Morten; Damsgaard, Jan (2012) Genesis and Evolution of Digital Payment Platforms. The European Conference on Information Systems in Barcelona, Spain. Link.

Carton, F. Hedman, J., Damsgaard J. Tan, K. and B. McCarthy (2012) Framework for Mobile Payments Integration, Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, vol 15. Link.

Learning & Skills

COMING SOON

Sports Digitalization

Sports Digitalization at Copenhagen Business School, Department of Digitalization

Ever since its first manifesto in Greece around 3000 years ago, sports as a field has accumulated a long history with strong traditions while at the same time, gone through tremendous changes toward professionalization and commercialization. The current waves of digitalization have intensified its evolution, as digital technologies are increasingly entrenched in a wide range of sporting activities and for applications beyond mere performance enhancement.

Though the use of digital tools in sports can be traced back to Michael Lewis’ “Moneyball” where Billy Bean, the head coach of Oakland Athletics, deployed analytics to make decisions regarding the composition of the team, nowadays digitalization in sports settings goes beyond data analytics, and expands to areas such as organizing and managing sports teams and their stakeholders, accessing and interpreting sports information, inventing new instruments and strategies that would not be possible otherwise. Further, digitalization has also led to creation of new sports – e-sports, which poses profound implications for the very nature of the sports field.

The research theme of sports digitalization focuses on the broad phenomenon of digitalization in the context of professional sports. Our goal is three-fold: (1) to examine how sports organizations have approached digitalization and utilized various digital tools across different sports areas; (2) to understand how digitalization and/or digital technologies changes the practices and the very organization of sports; (3) and to develop informed guidelines to sports organizations in their journey towards digitalization. Potential projects of the theme include but not limited to:

  • e-sports and its relationship with traditional sports
  • Sports analytics, its use and impacts
  • Digitalization of sports related experiences
  • Digitalization and the changing nature of sports

 

Who we are:

Further information and inquiries:

Xiao Xiao

xx.digi@cbs.dk

Related publications:

 

The page was last edited by: Department of Digitalization // 11/12/2020