Green Transition: New perspectives on Tour de France

Researchers working within Green Transition from CBS have used the big event in Denmark for field studies. They will now analyze the results.

07/07/2022

Tour de France
Photo: Grand Départ Copenhagen Denmark 2022 I/S
 

It is not just the riders who have been working hard in the first days of the cycling race Tour de France, which this year started in Denmark. So has a number of CBS-researchers from the Consumer and Behavioural Insights Group (CBIG).

While Yves Lampaert, Fabio Jakobsen and Mads Pedersen tested each other on the roads, the researchers tested the eating habits of the many spectators in Fælledparken, Copenhagen. Friday and Saturday around 20.000 people gathered to watch the race on a big screen, and the arrangement also included music and food stalls.

“For us, the event was a great opportunity to do a field study,” explains Associate Professor Jan Bauer from Department of Management, Society and Communication.

“We are interested in better understanding people’s food choice and their knowledge in relation to how our food consumption affects the climate,” adds Jan Bauer.

 

Copenhagen as a case study

Many people know that flying is bad for the climate. But do they know about the impact of their food choices and how much it differs between available options?

This field study was conducted as part of the BEACON project. This project explores and tests behavioural changes towards sustainable lifestyles to support the building of a circular society. The research focuses on urban food systems and experiments in a real world setting of a city, Copenhagen, so the project also involves a cooperation with the Copenhagen municipality and different companies.

“Many people know that flying is bad for the climate. But do they know about the impact of their food choices and how much it differs between available options? And does such knowledge ultimately affect their choices? Or is it just price, taste, health, or something completely different? People can report on such considerations, but it is always better to observe their actual behaviour,” says Jan Bauer.

That’s why the CBS-researchers with help from some very engaged students decided to use the Tour de France event with all its food stalls and spectators as a field study.

“We had prepared a number of questions for people and provided them with information. We were excited to collaborate with several food companies at the festival, and such partnerships provide a great potential for both parties.  So, we are looking forward to find out what the data will tell us and whether our research hypotheses were confirmed. Starting out with a field study at Tour de France was really interesting” says Jan Bauer.

Read more about the project, which is funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation and will run over the next 3 years.

The page was last edited by: Sekretariat for Ledelse og Kommunikation // 07/07/2022