CBS Impact Project

Bringing together the CEOs of a number of large Danish companies, CBS researchers and students, we ask what impact have these companies had on the Danish society? What challenges do they face? How do we as students, business university and society understand their agendas and corporate change?

 

Novo Nordisk
Novo Nordisk
Danske Bank
Danske Bank
Arla Foods a.m.b.a.
Arla Foods
A.P. Møller-Mærsk
Click to go to the A.P. Møller-Mærsk Impact site

Today, the Danish economy is in the middle of a paradigm shift - the same position as it was 100 years ago, when the foundation for CBS was established.

The development in Danish business and trade during the past 25 years have been marked by a fundamental paradox; a detachment between the growth of large Danish companies and the Danish economy. This detachment was especially prominent after the financial crisis in 2008, where more than 100.000 private Danish workplaces were lost simultaneously with four major Danish companies created more than 100.000 positions globally.

Based on these developments, CBS has launched CBS Impact Days – an initiative bringing together research and top management in the pursuit of answering one of this time’s possibly biggest questions:

How is the Danish economy and societal development connected to the development and growth of the largest Danish companies?

CBS Impact Project has teamed up with A.P. Møller-Mærsk, Novo Nordisk, Danske Bank, and Arla Foods to investigate their role vis-à-vis the Danish economic and societal development. Case studies provided by CBS researchers serve as the foundation for an exciting discussion with CEOs, open to anyone interested in expanding their knowledge on the interaction between some of the largest Danish companies and Denmark, and how their CEOs picture the future. The CBS Impact Summit will take place on 16 November 2017. With this summit, CBS Impact Days wish to create debate and dialogue with the companies and CEOs, create network and new knowledge in the collaboration between CBS’s researchers and students as well as the companies and politicians.

 

A.P. Møller-Mærsk
Being a worldwide conglomorate that operates in around 130 countries with a workforce of over 86,000 employees, Maersk has come a long way since the establishment in 1904 in Svendborg, Denmark. Owning one of the world’s largest container shipping companies, Maersk is involved in a wide range of activities in the shipping, logistics, and the oil and gas industries, summarized in five core business areas.

Considering its immense size even compared to other top Danish companies, how does Maersk identify itself with respect to being Danish? How do they interact with society other than creating workplaces and paying taxes? Curious about the future course for Maersk? So are we!

Novo Nordisk
Novo Nordisk is a global healthcare company with more than 90 years of innovation and leadership in diabetes care. Founded in the 1920s in Copenhagen, today Novo Nordisk is headquartered in Denmark, employs approximately 41,600 people in 75 countries and markets its products in more than 180 countries. 

With sales in the U.S. accounting for a little more than 50%, how many employees does Novo Nordisk actually have in Denmark? Having worldwide opertions with more than 41,600 employees spread across 75 countries, how does being headquartered in Denmark impact their business? According to Lars Fruergaard Jørgensen, do the Danish roots play a role in the future growth of the global pharmaceuticals company?

Arla Foods a.m.b.a.
Arla Foods is a global dairy cooperative owned by European farmers, meaning that the revenue is equally distributed across every liter of milk delivered by the farmers. The idea of a dairy cooperative dates way back to the 1880s, where milk producers in Denmark and Sweden teamed up to invest in shared dairy production. In 2000, the largest Danish and Swedish dairy cooperatives merged, creating the first international dairy cooperative - Arla foods. Today, through mergers in the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and Luxembourg are represented in the ownership too. And Arla Foods continues to expand. 

12.700. That’s how many farmers spread across all of Europe that make up today’s Arla Foods characterized by being a cooperative. A concept that can almost be coined the Danish Model. But how do you give back to society in a country like Denmark, when you’re not paying taxes?

The page was last edited by: Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy // 02/06/2017
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